Brothers (and sister) in Arms

Brothers (and sister) in Arms

So much of the fear in having a child with Down syndrome is – how will this affect my other children?

If you already have children I’m sure you can relate to this idea that you just couldn’t ‘do’ this to them. The idea of introducing a child with a disability into their lives can be confronting. You might be afraid that this would be a tremendous burden that they could and should do without. Let us share with you that what you actually ‘do’ by giving your children a sibling with Down Syndrome is give them an extraordinary gift.

Breaking a diagnosis

Breaking a diagnosis

"Does he have Down Syndrome?" Charlie tentatively asked the paediatrician 👨‍⚕️. "I was just about to prepare you for that conversation, yes... I think he does" she said.
Going into battle

Going into battle

When soldiers go into battle, they fight shoulder to shoulder, facing forward. But when they come home, there is no relationship like that of soldiers who have fought together. Our battle is one against the sorrows, challenges and pitfalls that life (and particularly Motherhood) throw at us, and we - facing forward – are only able to help each other in short spells when the air is clear before knuckling down for the next round. When our boots are on the ground, we can sometimes see our friend’s chaos in our peripheries but we can’t always hold off our own line to get there in time.
We are not sad

We are not sad

When it comes to having a child with a disability, there may be tears and there may be pockets of pain. But when people watch us, when they walk past and look a little closer at Raph, I always notice my head raise high with pride. By choosing to fight, we've made the best choice for him – to have life. There are lots of emotions that come with disability, but I promise you, sadness is not one of them.
Good Mates

Good Mates

Good mates are there at the best and the worst moments of your life. We all have a bank of golden memories involving the good times we have shared with our friends. These are the moments we always look forward to and there is nothing easier than having fun with your mates. What is not so easy is to be there for your mates when the going gets tough. Awkwardly putting your hand on your mate’s shoulder and talking through how they’re feeling when things are pretty rubbish is definitely not as fun as a summer afternoon drinking beers and watching the footy, but despite this, a good mate will recognise the signs that someone is doing it tough, and will insist upon offering whatever assistance is at their disposal.